Current Graduate Courses

Course Timetable

View the 2020-21 CDTPS graduate course timetable

MA Required Courses (effective September 2020)

As an introduction to graduate-level theatre and performance history and historiography, this course will teach students how to do theatre and performance history. It will combine consideration of selected topics and case studies with methodological awareness of the problems and questions that arise in the writing of such histories. The course will endeavor to present theatre and performance history as a subject that encompasses dramatic literature, material culture, embodiment, visual culture—and even how history can itself be understood as drama. Emphasis will be directed towards learning how to contextualize and situate sources within their historical and cultural frameworks.

Instructor: Holger Syme
Time: Fall, Thursday, 3-6
Location: online

This course provides an experiential learning opportunity to MA students by allowing them to pursue a practice-based project of their design under the supervision of a faculty member and with feedback from their cohort. Major components of the course are the discussion and application of various models of integrating critical analysis into practice, the introduction of different modes of research-based and critical creative practice, the development of students’ individual projects toward a workshop-oriented presentation, and the practice of peer critique.

Instructor: TBD
Time: Winter, Wednesday, 10-1
Location: Robert Gill Theatre

This course provides introduction to the overlapping fields of drama, theatre and performance studies at the graduate level. Engaging the key texts in these fields, the course also addresses recent scholarship and artworks. It may include playtexts, performance texts, and theory, and develops and refines critical reading and analysis of this material. The course also models how scholars in the three fields use case studies to integrate analysis with theory. It builds a foundation for scholarly inquiry by incorporating local, national and international scholarship, and examines interrelationships of scholarly and artistic works.

Instructor: Nikki Cesare Schotzko
Time: Fall, Thursday, 10-1
Location: online

This course provides a capstone experience to MA students by allowing them to pursue a major research project of their design under the supervision of a faculty member. It has two options: a written scholarly thesis of approximately 40-50 pages or a hybrid artistic and scholarly project comprising a practical component and a substantial, 20-page long critical essay explicating the project’s conceptualization and execution. This work is evaluated by the course instructor and two other readers assigned from within the faculty of the Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies. The course develops students’ conceptual understanding and methodological competence.

Instructor: Nikki Cesare Schotzko
Time: Winter/Spring, Thursday, 10-12
Location: Seminar Room (KS 330)

PhD Required Courses (effective September 2020)

Sources and Concepts of Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies I is the first of a two-part cycle of foundational PhD-level semester courses in international histories of intellectual and creative ideas that inform drama, theatre, and performance studies. The courses invite students to examine the most significant dramatic and theatrical developments—in both theories and practices—across cultures. They focus on the historically, methodologically and theoretically informed analyses of dramatic texts, theatre productions, and performances with reference to their formal and stylistic choices, performative significance, cultural systems and conventions, and historical contexts. The courses provide ways of integrating culture-specific theory/criticism/ideas into a comprehensive understanding of world drama, theatre, and performance. This cycle may not use a fixed structure. According to the course instructor’s pedagogical approach and academic expertise, the courses may be organized along chronology, around themes, with a focus on geography, or with a combination of the previous perspectives.

Instructor: Antje Budde
Time: Fall, Thursday, 2-5
Location: online

Sources and Concepts of Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies II is the second of a two-part cycle of foundational PhD-level semester courses in international histories of intellectual and creative ideas that inform drama, theatre, and performance studies. The courses invite students to examine the most significant dramatic and theatrical developments—in both theories and practices—across cultures. They focus on the historically, methodologically and theoretically informed analyses of dramatic texts, theatre productions, and performances with reference to their formal and stylistic choices, performative significance, cultural systems and conventions, and historical contexts. The courses provide ways of integrating culture-specific theory/criticism/ideas into a comprehensive understanding of world drama, theatre, and performance. This cycle may not use a fixed structure. According to the course instructor’s pedagogical approach and academic expertise, the courses may be organized along chronology, around themes, with a focus on geography, or with a combination of the previous perspectives.

Instructor: Tamara Trojanowska
Time: Winter, Friday, 9-12
Location: Seminar Room (KS 330)

Modelling New Scholarship is a PhD-only seminar focusing on the practice of professional scholarship in drama, theatre, and performance studies. In the course, students cultivate the research, writing, and presentation skills necessary for success in graduate school and the professional sphere. It serves as an introduction to some of the most current scholarship in the field, and develops the tools—analysis, historiography, theory—required both to engage with and to produce original work. Students will examine how scholars translate their research into original contributions to the field: from dissertation chapters, to conference presentations, to journal articles, and monographs. Students will also gain an overview of the profession, including relevant organizations, conferences, and journals, and learn how to gear their writing toward a particular audience. The seminar also considers the ways in which scholarship in drama, theatre, and performance studies both intersects with, and distinguishes itself from, other disciplines, including cultural studies, history, ethnography, and literary studies. The course may include a public humanities and/or community-based component.

Instructor: Jacob Gallagher-Ross
Time: Fall, Tuesday, 1-3
Location: online

This course is designed to acquaint students with contemporary approaches and issues in teaching and learning as they pertain to the interdisciplinary field of drama, theatre and performance studies. Emphasis will be on the theory and practice of knowledge construction and transmission. By the end of the course, students will have developed a stronger understanding of the history of pedagogy in the field, considered important theoretical paradigms in relation to their practical applications, been introduced to Indigenous and non-Western perspectives on teaching and learning, developed and experimented with specific teaching techniques appropriate to their individual professional goals, and positioned their own values and practice in relation to a community of learning, producing a statement of teaching philosophy.

Instructor: Elliot Leffler
Time: Winter, Monday, 9:30-12:30 
Location: Robert Gill Theatre (KS 325)

This course has three components: (1) students prepare for and compose their dissertation proposal; (2) methodological training through which students further develop their research skills pertaining to their specific dissertation projects; and (3) logistical guidance as the students fulfil language requirements, secure a supervisor, and compile a supervisory committee. This course is CR/NCR.

Instructor: Xing Fan
Time: Fall, Monday, 1-4
Location: online

Electives

Concentrating upon the in-depth knowledge and practice of playwriting with an emphasis on advanced style and technique of writing. Students develop their own  work through in-class exercises, one major written assignment, and the final public presentation.

Selection is based on an portfolio submission. Applications will open in mid September. Apply online by November 10th. https://drama-apply.chass.utoronto.ca/login 
Instructor: Djanet Sears
Time: Winter, Tuesday, 6-9
Location: Playhouse (UP 200)

An advanced-level exploration of skills and techniques related to set and costume design for a production, with more opportunity for independent work. Students are expected to participate in Drama Centre productions (Director’s Showcase) in senior creative roles. Previous experience with designing set and/ or costume design for a theatre production is necessary.

Please contact snezana.pesic@utoronto.ca for permission to enroll in the course. 
Instructor: Snezana Pesic
Time: Fall, Tuesday 10–1, Wednesday 2–5
Location: online

This course will introduce approaches to a praxis (applied theory, critical making) of digital dramaturgy where process (dramaturgy as a conceptual and technical instrument) will be central rather than product (dramaturgy as a tool). The methodological approach is inspired by ideas of experiential learning and experimental performance, thus making connections between the humanities, the sciences and social sciences. Digital Dramaturgy in this context is understood as a critical instrument of imagining, making and questioning inter-medial connections between material and immaterial bodies, analogue and digital technologies in mediated performance space-times. Students will be required to design and perform projects based on rigorous experimental methods.

The thematic focus will provocatively investigate ideas of artistic intelligence (A/I) in the context of current debates and technological advances in artificial intelligence (AI). Central to the dialectical debate will be questions about imaging technologies (i.e. MRI, facial recognition, sensory robotics) vs. imagining technologies (i.e. dreams, imagination, awe, storytelling, alternative realities/utopia/dystopia, critical doubt and laughter).

Instructor: Antje Budde
Time: Winter, Wednesday, 2-5
Location: Luella Massey Studio Theatre (GM)

How do artists, audiences, and scholars understand and engage with puppetry? How do puppets combine anthropomorphic elements with craftsmanship, engineering, and technology? How do puppeteers define their roles, artistry, and the aesthetics of their puppets? This course offers an examination of the philosophical, historical, cultural, political, and technological dimensions of puppetry and material performance in a global context. Some important themes include different kinds of puppet practices; scholarly efforts that constantly reshape puppet historiography; transformations of puppet traditions; the art of operation and the theatricality of the performing object; and the imagination of puppetry in new physical and virtual venues. Course activities include lectures, presentations, discussions, projects, and engagement in the BMO Lab. Students will have the opportunity to explore topics of their interest.

Instructor: Xing Fan
Time: Fall, Monday 6–8
Location: online

This course offers an examination of the intersection of sound studies and theatre studies. The class surveys basic theories of sound studies, and investigates the technological, cultural, and social production of soundscapes in theatre in a global context. We will develop discussions of important themes such as listening, music, the voice, the technology, the politics of sound, and the art of sound. Students will have the opportunity to conduct research on topics of their interest.

Instructor: Xing Fan
Time: Winter, Tuesday 2–4
Location: Seminar Room

This interdisciplinary graduate course explores the collision between the arts and technologies with all of its creative potential, unintentional collateral damage, compelling attraction, and complex social implications. It brings together scholars, artists, and students from Drama/Theatre, Visual Studies, Comparative Literature Music, Engineering, and Computer Science who are already excited by and engaged in this intersection. For students coming from an arts background the course offers direct experience of emerging technologies and chance to explore their applications to their research. For students with a technology background, the course provides the opportunity to integrate their research into an art-based, publicly presented project. The course exposes all of the students to rigorous interdisciplinary practices and their conceptual, practical and theoretical challenges through group discussions, concept generation, practical experimentation and research, and engagement with visiting artists. The course will culminate in a collaborative performance project.

Please note: entry into this course requires an interview. Contact Prof. Kleber at pia.kleber@utoronto.ca.

Instructors: Pia Kleber and David Rokeby
Time: Winter, Monday, 4-7
Location: BMO Lab (KS 320)

Syllabus

This survey course explores the complex, varied and, sometimes, troubled interface between place and contemporary Indigenous performance in North America. Students will have the opportunity to interrogate and experientially engage with a broad range of Indigenous and non-Indigenous theories of place to explore the subtle relational shifts between Indigenous peoples and their traditional territories through the “window” of contemporary performance and new media projects, and to interact with some of the artists who embody these shifts within their creations. Students will be required throughout the term to lead a seminar and to complete a research project of their own design. Practice-based research models will be encouraged.

Instructor: Jill Carter
Time: Fall, Wednesday, 6-9
Location: online

What has happened to the relationship between performance and religion? Has the Enlightenment project successfully secularized Western civilization and our thinking about a human subject in light of its most important horizon – the finitude of existence? Or can we still decipher religious thinking in the works of theatre artists whose practice, like that of the leading Western philosophers, such as Walter Benjamin, Emmanuel Lévinas, and Jacque Derrida, still bear traces of theological underpinnings when dealing with this finitude? These questions, among others, lead our investigation into transgressive cryptotheologies at the crossroads of performance, philosophy and religion in the Western theatre of the 20th and 21st centuries.

Instructor: Tamara Trojanowska
Time: Fall, Friday, 10-12
Location: online

Reading and Research Courses

Our departmental policy regarding reading or research courses: 

1. PhD students can take up to one Y or two H reading/research courses during their studies in our program. MA students may take one H reading/research course.

2. Generally, PhD students who take two H reading/research courses should choose different topics for those and change instructors with a new H course. Exceptions can be made on a case to case basis pending approval of the department’s director or associate director. However, this will not happen on a regular basis.

To request a reading/research course you must: 

1. Write a proposal for such a course.

2. Find an instructor who is willing to take you on as a student for such a course on the basis of your proposal.

3. Submit your proposal (after revisions by your instructor) along with the filled out Request for Reading and/or Research Course form and a tentative reading list. Make sure, that you and the instructor agree on the number, deadlines and grade value of the course assignments.

Make sure that you provide information about the frequency of meetings with your instructor (i.e. bi-weekly 2 hours, weekly 1 hour, monthly four hours).

4. Sign the form, get the signatures of your instructor and finally the signature of the associate director (after approval you can be enrolled by our Graduate Administrator). Always check the School of Graduate Studies deadlines for course enrolment.

Cross-listed Courses

The following courses may be of interest to CDTPS students. Please note that enrolment may be limited as students enrolled in these departments have enrolment priority.

MUS3805H Max/MSP
Winter, Tuesday 1-3
Gregory Lee Newsome

MUS3632H Video for Intermedia Performance
Fall, Tuesday 1-3
Gregory Lee Newsome

Please contact greg.newsome@utoronto.ca and cc gradadmin.music@utoronto.ca to enroll. 

ITA 1597H Commedia dell’arte / Topics: Scripted and Performance Texts in the Commedia dell’arte Tradition
Winter, Tuesday 10-12
Domenico Pietropaolo

CTL1048HF Qualitative Methodology: Challenges and Innovations
Fall, Tuesday 1-4
Kathleen Marie Gallagher

CTL1062HS Performed Ethnography and Research Informed Theatre
Winter, Wednesday 5-8
Tara Goldstein

Students whose interests can be served by courses offered in other departments should consult the Associate Director, Graduate about their choices. A few examples include: